Toileting All Ages


        

Toilet Training for Pups and Older Dogs

New Puppies
dogAt birth a new-born puppy is unable to toilet on its own, It would actually die if it was not stimulated by the mother.

Mum licks the puppies around their genital areas,  this causes the pups to urinate and defecate,  then she eats and drinks it, in doing so, she cleans up as she goes along

Imagine half a dozen pups defecating and urinating all at the same time. They would end up up on a pile of pee or poo that could lead to contamination and disease, it would certainly be wet and probably cold and the bacteria could cause fatalities.

The smell could also attract predators, therefore nature keeps these young puppies safe whilst they are helpless blind and deaf.

Around three weeks of age they begin to be able to see their surroundings and hear what it going on. It is at this time the puppies begin to soil for themselves without the need for stimulation from Mum. It is like a switch has gone on in their head.

At this time the mum will still clean up after the puppies until they can scamper around. Then around three and a half weeks old, the mother begins to train them to toilet outside the nesting area. If she sees the puppy squatting, she will quite aggressively tell them off until they start to toilet outside of their sleeping and living area.

It is instinctive for dogs to avoid toileting in  their sleeping or eating areas, however this is reinforced by the mothers actions. As the puppies become more able, they will  move out of the nesting box to toilet.  

If we were never involved or interfered with our puppies,  the pup's natural instincts plus the learning they received from their mother, would have them toilet trained by about 16 weeks However, due to our interference many young pups become fearful or confused by our actions and behaviour..

Crate Training
The Finest Crates and Playpens For Puppies AvailableI recently tested a number of crates, the only one that was manufactured in the UK, was head and shoulders above the others. I will not put a puppy or adult dog in any other crate or playpen, other than those made by MTM. And that is why I decided to sell them in my Store

Guaranteed for the life of the dog and beyond. All cages and playpens feature a high quality electro plated finish, to ISO9002 standards, which ensures rust resistance and ease of cleaning and safety. I also now stock Playpens for Puppies 

Restricting your new pups movements, can be vital to successful to early toilet training crate training. To do this properly then I would highly recommend Crate Training.

You could of course restrict the puppy by placing it in to play pen (more later) or a small room like a bathroom or services or laundry room.

These areas generally have lino or tiles down, that make it easier to clean up the little accidents. Having said that I believe the best way to restrict access to other places where the dog may toilet is a crate for the following reasons.

1. If you go away you can take a secure crate to keep him in.

2. If your dog is injured or needs an operation the first thing a Vet will do is put him in a crate, If he has never been crate trained that will be really traumatic.

3. If your dog breaks a leg or has cruciate ligament or hip problems he will need  a secure place to stay indoors when he needs rest and recuperation.

4. If you have children round and the dog needs time out and some peace, a crate is ideal.

dog defecatingA crate is the ideal answer to most early training, and adult and puppies rest and recuperation problems. The pup will not want to defecate or urinate in it own bed, hence the use of the crate
 in toilet training

However, if the puppy does manage to toilet in the wrong location, do not reprimand or show your disapproval in any way. You will not teach the puppy not to toilet in the house by doing this.

You will simply be teaching him/her not to toilet in your presence. Then when you go to the outside toilet spot, puppy will not want to toilet because it may make you angry as it did inside

Furthermore, when you return indoors, the puppy will take the first opportunity to find an appropriate spot (your bedroom or the living room - anywhere away from his/her own sleeping and eating areas) to eliminate, when you're not watching!

Obvious Signs Dog  Wants To Toilet
Watch for the obvious times that your puppy will need to toilet, such as immediately after a meal or a big drink; upon waking up; after a play session; and any other time in between! Ensure that the puppy is in the correct toilet location at these times.

If, while watching your puppy in your house, you observe the pre-toileting behaviours such as sniffing, circling, etc. (it will vary from one puppy to the next), rush the puppy to the backdoor, keeping him/her close to floor level so that they can see where they are being taken and how to get to their correct toilet spot.

Cleaning Up After Accidents
Thoroughly clean the areas where the puppy has had accidents. The scent of urine or faeces indoors will stimulate a puppy to stop and toilet there. Use this fact to your advantage by collecting up any droppings and placing them in the grassy area where you would like the puppy to toilet - he/she will believe that this area is his/her chosen toilet.

Feeding your puppy indoors and locating water bowls indoors will hasten the understanding that these areas are not suitable for toileting. Take the blame for any mistakes yourself - you were not paying sufficient attention. Remember, your puppy's Mum cleaned up without scolding - attempting to reprimand the puppy for a bodily function will only create anxiety.

The puppy is not suffering from guilt when you walk into the room where the pup has had an accident - he/she simply knows that the presence of a puddle or pile and you in the same room is bad news!

When Should You Expect Improvements
Most puppies will be showing a vast improvement by 12 weeks of age, though still having occasional accidents. Toilet training is a natural process and will happen unaided in most instances. However, there will be a wide range of ease or difficulty from one pup to the next.

Try to remain calm and accepting - your stress will be obvious to your puppy and may undermine his/her confidence and trust in you as a consistent, reliable natured leader, capable of taking care of their needs and providing protection.

Older Dogs
The Older Dog Can Have Toileting ProblemsFor older dogs experiencing toilet training difficulties, you can first try to implement the above procedures.

However, the problem usually occurs for a wide range of possible reasons and specific assessment and an individual program may be required.

Take into consideration the age of the dog and the possibility that their could be medical reasons why this behaviour has suddenly started such as kidney trouble.  

Quite often it can be caused by a trauma or change in circumstances such as:
(1) A Recent House Move

(2) Other Dogs Have been To Your House.

(3) Frightening Experiences such as Loud Bangs or Fireworks etc.

(4) A Death in The Family or a Crisis.

(5) Tension or Stress in the Family Unit.

(6) The Death of Another Dog in the Household

Urination
If it is a sudden change in your dog's normal behaviour, it could be caused not by behaviour but by medical problems. 

Bladderor bowel infection, or some other medical problem could be the reason, so check that with your vet first. It's also rather common for older spayed bitches to start dribbling.

This is easily fixed most of the time with doses of oestrogen. In many cases, the doses can be tapered off after a few months. Some dogs require oestrogen for the rest of their lives. Only small doses are needed, so it's not that expensive to treat.

If your dog is urinating in different places around the house, you can try the "vinegar trick". Pour some vinegar on the spot in front of the dog. What you're telling the dog with this is the controller of resources,. YOU must not pee here." Then clean it all up first with biological washing powder and a final wipe over with surgical spirit.

 

Defecation
Defecation is not usually a problem as much as urination can be. However, the most often recommended remedy for a dog that defecates in the house is to change its feeding times, so that you are likely to be walking the dog when it needs to defecate or it is outside in the garden.. This will take some time as you will need to experiment with the amount, frequency, and timing of feeding your dog to get the results you want.

 Stan Rawlinson 2003

 
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This article was written by ©Stan Rawlinson (The Original Doglistener). A professional full time Dog Behaviourist and Obedience Trainer.

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