Humping and Chasing Other Dogs | Doglistener

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Humping and Chasing Other Dogs

Dogs That Hump and Chase Other Dogs
Plus a very funny letter from a neighbour whose dogs were being humped
 

The Humper: I am sure there are many dog owners have met the dog botherer, chaser and humper?  

That is the dog whose owner is somewhere in the distance yelling and screaming ineffectually at their dog.

That is assuming they have actually noticed the dog is ½ a mile away creating havoc because they are usually on their phone.

The dog, of course, is having a great time totally out of control and will ignore any and all commands, as it has always done.

Why does the owner actually imagine that this time will be different from all the rest of times the dog has behaved in this way?

Think of the video of Fenton and the Deer in Richmond Park that went viral?

These out of control mutts comes racing over to you to give your dogs a sound humping, or it starts chasing them around often barking at them.

When the owner actually turns up they say things like “he’s only playing” whilst pinning your latest pup to the ground happily rogering it, despite the fact that your dog is the same sex.

Why Do Dogs Hump: in dogs under a year old, humping can be either play or sexual in nature. But in older dogs, it can be a sign of dominant and controlling behaviour.

Sometimes it is a reaction to something that has stimulated and excited the dog like visitors arriving. It can also be a sign that this dog hasn’t been socialised with other dogs and puppies during the critical period between 0 to 16 weeks. This is known as the Canine Socialisation Period.

Puppies that are not socialised during that critical period do not understand that this is not acceptable canine behaviour.

Some sensitive dogs can be totally traumatised by this behaviour.

Though humping and mounting can be a commonplace play behaviour in puppies, as adults this behaviour can cause a violent and aggressive reaction from the victim.

It’s done by males and females to the opposite and same sex, It can also be triggered by stress or lack of exercise.

However, the main reason dogs hump is because of the lack of integration with other dogs during the critical canine socialisation period,

This period is when puppies learn canine communication skills, body language and to accept and how to meet and greet other dogs in an acceptable way

It is also the time. they learn that some dogs will not accept indiscriminate mounting, and will react badly to that behaviour. The offender then learns to curb this behaviour.

Two days ago in Bushy Park, a large German Shepherd ran up to my dogs and decided to play chase with my wife’s Miniature Daccie.

She screamed when this dog chased her and the owner said. ”Oh he is only playing” The man who of course was on his phone when it initially happened (aren’t they always) was taken aback when I asked him "how was my little dog going to know that?"  I doubt that fact had ever crossed his mind.

Are Some Dogs Constantly Targeted: The simple answer is yes! .The reason why some dogs are constantly bothered by other mainly male dogs trying to hump them is they will have been neutered paediatrically. These dogs both male and female give off a smell that is similar to a dog in season.

This smell is caused by neutering some dogs whilst it is still immature. Unfortunately, there is very little you can do to alleviate this problem, and is just one of many medical and behavioural problems caused by spaying and castrating dogs before they have reached both social and physical maturity. Isn't it a pity the vets do not explain the very real downside of neutering dogs and especially immature ones. Read my article (1) Spaying and Castration Overview. Often we are told to neuter the dog, in other words, spay or castrate and that will cure the problem.

Actually, that is not the case, yes it can help in some cases of male dogs humping, and that humping is hormonal, but not in females. Normally if the male is mounting male and female dogs then neutering tends not to work.

What You Need to Do: Quite often these humpers and out of control dogs have zero recall and have never been taught the “OFF” command.

That is a command where the dogs will stop whatever it is doing by just saying “OFF”.

Of course, it is better to initiate this when the dogs are puppies. However, it can is very successful with older dogs as well.

So how do you set the “OFF” command? It is fairly simple however, you do need to set it deep into the dogs subconscious for it to work, even when the dog focused on something else.

For this to work properly, you will need to purchase the jingler and either own or buy a suitable lead and collar for your dog.

Do not train your dogs with a harness except for the recall and stop whistle and never use a halti. This explains why (2) Choosing the Right Lead and Collar

The jingler is a device I invented in 2002 after realising that dogs do not see us as another dog they see us as a resource. This is explained in my article (3) Dogs and the Alpha Myth.

You can also see the jingler in action and further information and a short clip from my Jingler training video (4) Jingler Further Information.

On top of the “OFF” command, you should also put a stop whistle in place on your chasing and humping dog. This article explains what you need to have a strong recall and the all-important stop whistle (5) Recall and Stop Whistle. These techniques also work for the dogs that also hump people.

Below is a letter sent after new neighbour’s dog kept humping and bothering her dogs. Unfortunately, the author is anonymous or I would have credited a very funny and clever letter, 

Letter from a disgruntled neighbour whose dogs are getting humped by a new neighbours dog

Dear Neighbour

It was good to meet you and your dog once again this morning. I'm sorry the circumstances were such that we couldn't have a proper chat, but I'm afraid that being in a situation where I was restraining my four agitated and angry dogs whilst trying to ward your dog off with my foot as he tried to hump them indiscriminately wasn't conducive to chit-chat.

Unfortunately we have had similar encounters several times since you moved here a few weeks ago, and as my dogs are neutered males and spayed females who don't appreciate your dog's relentless advances things can get a little lively when we meet, so I thought perhaps a letter might help to break the ice as it were.

I appreciate that your dog ran over two fields and nearly a quarter of a mile to get to mine, so it was going to take you a little time to get there to retrieve him. However, for next time I'd suggest spending 15 minutes standing two fields away angrily screaming his name possibly wasn't the best use of your time. It hasn't worked on any previous occasion and didn't work this morning, so could I respectfully suggest that next time you cut that part out of the process and come and get your dog straight away?

Anyway, I was sure as hell pleased to see you after 25 minutes of my dogs being humped, barged and jumped on. It was a shame that having finally managed to catch your dog and get hold of his collar you only let us get a few yards down the path before you released him, so he immediately came after us and the whole performance started again, but hey, that's dogs for you. Whoever in the world could have predicted he would do that?

We did talk a little last time about how you could stop your dog continuously running off and bothering other dogs, and I'll accept that you have indeed tried everything... except training apparently. Or rewards, as he should do what you tell him without them. Dogs are certainly clever animals, but I'd never before realised that they had a sense of ethics and obligation to do the right thing, I certainly learned a few things from our conversation. To think of all that time I've wasted with clickers and treats!

On that subject, I'm still not entirely sure how smacking him when you do finally manage to get hold of him will make him easier to catch next time - perhaps you could talk me through that one next time we meet?

We also briefly discussed that neutering might help curb his desire to streak off into the distance hump anything that moved, but you mentioned that you were considering using him at stud in due course as he a Pedigree Labrador with Papers.

Now I certainly can't claim to know a lot about Labradors, but if the standard for the breed specifies a potato-shaped body and short, stumpy legs your boy is certainly a fine example and it would obviously be a shame to rob future generations of his genes and he has Papers. I hate to break it to you, though - so does my newsagent but that doesn't make me want to have his babies.

You told me that you'd thought about an electric shock collar to tackle his tendency to run off, but were concerned about the cost. I'm sure the fact you didn't also mention any concerns about the effect of administering electric shocks on your dog's physical and psychological wellbeing was merely an oversight, but I thought I'd slip it in here just in case it's an aspect of these collars you may not have considered?

Anyway, having come home and pondered our mutual problem, I hope you are as pleased as I am that I have managed to come up with a tried and tested 100% effective solution that requires no time, input or effort from you and costs only a few pounds. There is a handy little gadget that savvy dog owners have been using for many years to address your sort of problem. It's very simple, a long strip of rope or leather with a loop at one end you can use as a handle, and a clever little clip at the other end that attaches to your dog's collar (you might have seen that metal ring on his collar and wondered what it was for?).

This brilliant device is called a lead - L.E.A.D. You attach it to your dog, hold the handle and hey presto, you have control of your dog and he can no longer run away! Most pet shops sell them - in fact, I probably have a spare I can loan you to try, just let me know.

You can thank me next time we meet. Or better still, if we don't meet that will be thanks enough.

© Stan Rawlinson April 2019

(1) Spaying and Castration Overview

(2) Choosing the Right Lead and Collar

(3) Dogs and the Alpha Myth.

(4) Jingler Further Information

(5) Recall and Stop Whistle

 

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